Institution

Tagged Items

Page 1 of 2. Displaying 1 - 20 out of 24 total items.
Type Name Category
marker Biddle University
Biddle University was founded in 1867 by the Presbyterian Church to train “teachers and preachers,” leaders among the newly freed black population of the South. In 1923, it became Johnson C. Smith University and it remains a thriving educational institution today.
African American
image Biddle University
Biddle University is an historically black college founded in 1867 by the Presbyterian Church. In 1923, it was renamed the Johnson C. Smith University and is still serving the community of Charlotte to this day. Image courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room – Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. "Schools: Biddle University." The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story. The Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. 9 Nov. 2010. http://www.cmstory.org/1900/default.asp?heading=6&page=54
African American
image Biddle University Blacksmith
Image courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room – Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. "The Blacksmith and Print Shops, Biddle University." The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story. The Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. 27 Nov. 2010. http://www.cmstory.org/african/album/volume1/educat18.htm
African American
image Biddle University Print Shop
Image courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room – Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. "The Blacksmith and Print Shops, Biddle University." The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story. The Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. 27 Nov. 2010. http://www.cmstory.org/african/album/volume1/educat18.htm
African American
marker Brevard Street Library
The Brevard Street Library for Negroes opened in 1905, the first public library in North Carolina that served and was run by African Americans.
African American
image Brevard Street Library
The Brevard Street Library for Negroes was the first public library that served and was run by African Americans in North Carolina. Image courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room – Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. "Public Library: 1903-." The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story. 28 Nov. 2010. http://www.cmstory.org/exhibit/plcmc/3.htm
African American
image Brevard Street Library Reading Room
The Brevard Street Library for Negroes was the first public library that served and was run by African Americans in North Carolina. Image courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room – Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. "Sally Phelps and the Brevard Street Library for Negroes." The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story. The Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. 26 Oct. 2010. http://www.cmstory.org/african/album/volume1/work22.htm
African American
marker Carnegie Library
Charlotte’s grand Carnegie Library, one of many across the U.S. funded by steelmaker Andrew Carnegie, was completed in 1903. It refused to admit black patrons, for whom a “Colored Branch” opened on Brevard Street two years later.
White
image Carnegie Library
This segregated library opened in 1903 thanks to a grant from Andrew Carnegie. The circumstances surrounding its opening differ dramatically from that of the so-called "colored branch" located on Brevard street. Image courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room – Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. "Public Library: 1901-." The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story. 28 Nov. 2010. http://www.cmstory.org/exhibit/plcmc/2.htm
White
marker Clinton Chapel AME Zion Church
A central member in the network of AME Zion Churches in Charlotte, Clinton Chapel was founded in 1865, making it one of the first black churches in the Charlotte area.
African American
image Clinton Chapel AME Zion Church
A central member in the network of AME Zion Churches in Charlotte, Clinton Chapel was founded in 1865, making it one of the first black churches in the Charlotte area. Image courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room – Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. "Religion: Clinton Chapel AME Zion Church." The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story. The Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. 2010 Oct. 26. http://www.cmstory.org/1900/default.asp?heading=8&page=66
African American
marker Good Samaritan Hospital
Established in 1881, “Good Sam” was the first privately funded black hospital in North Carolina and perhaps the entire South.
African American
image Good Samaritan Hospital
Established in 1881, this was the first private hospital that served African Americans exclusively. Image courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room – Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. "Good Samaritan Hospital and Dr. James A. Pethel." The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story. The Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. 26 Oct. 2010. http://www.cmstory.org/african/album/volume1/work19.htm
African American
marker Myers Street School
The Myers Street School was built in 1886 and remained the only public school serving the African American community until 1907. Romare Bearden believes he may have attended this school.
African American
image Myers Street School
The Myers Street School was built in 1886 and remained the only public school serving the African American community until 1907. Romare Bearden believes he may have attended this school. Image courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room – Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. "Samuel B. Pride and the Myers Street School." The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story. The Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. 26 Oct. 2010. http://cmstory.org/african/album/volume1/educat02.htm
African American
marker North Graded School
This white-only school serves as a contrast to the Myers Street School.
White
image North Graded School
The North Graded School, for white children only, opened in 1900. The building cost was $35,000.
White
marker Pinewood Cemetery
The resting place of Romare Bearden's paternal great-grandparents, Rosa and H.B. Kennedy, as well as his great-great-grandparents and aunt and uncle Harry and Anna Bearden (née Alston).
Bearden biographical
marker St. Michael and All Angels Protestant Episcopal Church
Site of Romare Bearden's baptism. His father, Howard, was an organist.
Bearden biographical
image St. Michael and All Angels Protestant Episcopal Church
Romare was baptized in this church. His father, Howard, was an organist here, and his mother, Bessye, taught at the neighboring school. Image courtesy of the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room – Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. "St. Michael and All Angels Protestant Episcopal Church." The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story. The Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. 17 Oct. 2010. http://www.cmstory.org/african/album/volume1/rel14.htm
African American
<< previous | 1 | 2 |